Revisiting Jurassic World: Special effects, money shots and a weak narrative

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With Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom all set to hit the big screen on June 7, it’s time to revisit the film that started it all, Jurassic World. Directed by Colin Trevorrow and starring Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard in the lead, Jurassic World was a grand visual treat. But that’s about it.

Sure, it was full of money shots, and therefore it is no surprise that it was a mega hit at the box office and had minted a total collection of 1.672 billion dollars. A small yet crucial detail here – Jurassic World was made on the budget of 150 million dollars. Basically, Jurassic World ate the box office alive.

However, as far as the narrative is concerned, it was made up of holes. It will not be completely wrong to call the film’s screenplay a rehash of the movie that began this money-making franchise in the first place, Steven Spielberg’s 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park. Jurassic World’s narrative was weak, and to top it all, the characters were half-cooked. Of course, in a film that’s more or less driven by technology, one really didn’t expect much from the actors. In an interview with American talk show host Conan O’Brien, Pratt had revealed the amount of prep he had done for his role as the dino trainer Owen Grady.

“The face that you give is that you should really just do nothing…the worst thing you can do is overact,” Pratt told an amused O’Brien. And to Pratt’s credit, he didn’t overact at all, he barely acted. It’s more of just responding to situations, but in a fashion that didn’t really come across as genuine, which is really a shame as Pratt is a pretty good entertainer.

“I had three faces on this one (Jurassic World),” Pratt had said during the interview. And then had gone on to demonstrate the three faces which essentially were the same expressions.

Jurassic World was basically a reincarnation of Jurassic Park with scared guardians and children running amok among the life-threatening animals. The saving grace of the film was the visual effects which were quite mind-blowing. Be it the scene of the final battle between Indominus Rex, Tyrannosaurus Rex and Velociraptors or the squences that played out in the Jurassic world theme park itself, it was truly awe-inspiring. But the visual grandeur could not compensate for the thinly-sliced narrative that had nothing new to offer except for a fully functional theme park packed with dinos, an idea that was reportedly first pitched by executive producer and mastermind Steven Spielberg himself. Here’s hoping The Fallen Kindom makes up for what the previous film lacked.

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